Flu jab: Get yours today!

Well it’s upon us again; flu season is here. Every year my parents, brothers, carers and I have the Influenza shot which is free of charge here in the UK, courtesy of the NHS.

For as long as I can remember I’ve had the flu jab to protect myself through the harsh winter months. It’s important that not only I am vaccinated but that those closest to me are too. My immune system is much weaker than average and my condition makes it considerably more difficult to overcome respiratory infections. The common cold will hit me hard and can rapidly develop and deteriorate. It’s therefore very important that I am not unnecessarily exposed to the flu virus.

As I have aged, my declining respiratory function has become the most concerning symptom of my disability. Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy causes muscle degeneration and scoliosis. So not only are my lungs squashed and unable to expand as they should, the muscles that make them force air in and out are slowly wasting away.

Over the years I have had to fight recurrent chest infections, several bouts of pneumonia, pleurisy and a large pneumothorax requiring a chest drain. Many long, drawn-out days have been spent in hospital trying to overcome serious complications that resulted from a simple, everyday virus.

For this reason, I implore and encourage you to go and get the flu shot. It takes no time at all and I promise you it’s completely painless. There are fables floating around that will attempt to make you believe the flu jab can give you the flu. This is not the case at all. Yes, the vaccine contains a small dose of the inactive virus which triggers antibodies, which within two weeks will guard you if and when you’re exposed.

Like all viruses, Influenza strains change annually which is why it is essential to ensure you are vaccinated every year. I visited my local pharmacy, without appointment, a few weeks ago to get mine. If you haven’t already, don’t delay, go and get yours NOW!

For more information on the Influenza vaccine visit the NHS web page here.

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