What’s in my bag: UCMD edition

The ‘what’s in my bag’ post is a popular one amongst many bloggers. I guess it’s our innate curiosity that makes us so eager to know the personal contents of a complete strangers bag. Nosey beggars we are!

Nevertheless, most people carry around the same few items on a day-to-day basis, right?

– Wallet, phone, keys…

But what does a wheelchair user routinely carry with them?

Here’s an insight into what I, a young woman with muscular dystrophy, take with me in my bag.

  1. Ventolin Salbutamol inhaler with Haleraid – I keep one at home but also ensure I have one of these in my bag at all times. I find these inhalers difficult to use without the Haleraid device, which I highly recommend for those with small or weak hands.
  2. In addition to the usual house and car keys, I have a Radar key which provides access to over 9000 accessible toilets throughout the UK.
  3. Empty bottle – if you read my blog, you may be aware that I have a suprapubic catheter. So, when out and about, I have found it a good idea to keep an empty bottle with me. I’m sure I need not explain why…
  4. If using public toilets, it’s good practice to carry a small bottle of hand sanitiser. I get mine from Primark as they’re super cheap and portable. I’m also susceptible to coughs and colds so this helps me to avoid community acquired viruses.
  5. Wet wipes – I prefer a smaller bag as I’m rather petite. So I usually leave a packet of wet wipes in the car. These things are invaluable and versatile, particularly for us girls!                                                                After indulging in fast food, using public transport and toilets, refuelling the car, for cleaning a dusty wheelchair, or simply freshening up on hot summer days. Wet wipes are a must.
  6. Tissues – you can guarantee the one day I don’t put a tissue in my bag is when I’ll desperately need one.
  7. It’s now June and around this time of year I suffer with hay fever. As you may know if you read this previous post, I’m also allergic to horses. I therefore keep some antihistamines to hand, should I run into a horse. As you do.                                                                                                           You can buy Loratadine tablets for less than a pound in some shops. There’s no point spending more for branded versions, they all do the same job. However, if for any reason you struggle with tablets, I recommend Boots Hayfever Relief Instant-melts. They are quite pricey but as the name suggests, they melt easily on the tongue and leave no nasty aftertaste. And they work!
  8. Chewable multivitamins – I try to stay as healthy as possible by taking a daily multivitamin supplement. I have a big pot of tablets at home but on the go, I prefer to pop a sachet of chewy multivitamins in my bag. They’re much more lightweight than pills and you don’t need a drink to take them.
  9. Drink – usually Lucozade (although they have recently cut the sugar content by half resulting in a distinct change in flavour. Damn them!) I’m not in general a fan of energy drinks, nor do I have a sweet tooth. But this stuff got me through Uni. As I get older, I become weaker and more fatigued due to my muscular dystrophy.                                                     It’s not the healthiest thing in the world I know, but I’m pretty clean living otherwise. Lucozade helps fight exhaustion. Lucozade is my friend!
  10. Straws – I can still lift cups, glasses and bottles to drink from, but a straw just makes life so much easier, especially if you’re en-route and jigging about in the back of a wheelchair accessible vehicle! I often swipe them in bulk from the cinema or good old Maccie D’s.
  11. Ensure compact milkshake – if I’m out all day or travelling for several hours, I’ll take one of these with me for convenience. They’re easy to pop in your bag and one small bottle provides 300 calories. Some people complain about the taste. I’m not going to lie and tell you they’re delicious, but they’re certainly not offensive. And for those of you who struggle to keep your weight up and achieve a nutritionally complete diet, these do the job.
  12. Chewing gum – apart from the obvious purpose of maintaining minty fresh breath, gum really helps to relieve bloating. Like many with scoliosis, I struggle to eat a lot as there’s little room for expanse. But, sometimes my eyes are larger than my belly and I force myself to eat more than my body will allow. I then feel uncomfortable and even tight-chested. Chewing encourages a faster rate of digestion, thereby easing this discomfort.                                                                                            Furthermore, I’m not a particularly anxious person but I have noticed that chewing gum helps somewhat. Is this just me?
  13. Phone – everyone carries a mobile phone with them nowadays, but for me it’s essential. If I’m out in my car and it breaks down or there’s an accident, I can call someone. Similarly, if there’s a fault, malfunction or damage to my wheelchair, I would be stranded without my phone.
  14. Cards and cash – well, obviously. I wouldn’t get far without any money. I always have some cash with me for parking as well as ID since I look about twelve. I was born in the 80s, I swear.
  15. Blue badge – This lives in the car and it really is a huge help for us disabled folk. I’m out, here and there in my car most days and ever in search of accessible parking spaces. I couldn’t be without it.                                    

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