Life Update ~ Carers, Hoists and OT’s

Hi folks, I hope you are all healthy and happy.

I feel like it’s been a while since I blogged about the goings-on of my day-to-day life. Not a particularly exciting post, granted. But I thought it might be useful to share these ‘goings-on’ with you, as I’m sure there are some of you facing similar struggles.

I have for the past few months been occupied with life crap – specifically, disability-related life crap – which has meant that blogging has unfortunately had to take a backseat.

Righty right, I’ll try and keep it brief…

Care

As some of you may know, I live with my parents who are my primary source of support. I do have a part-time carer who I employ, but otherwise my Mom (yes, I say Mom vs Mum) is my main caregiver. Sadly she herself suffers with progressive osteoarthritis, and following exploratory surgery in October, it was decided that she needed a full knee replacement.

This in fact took place on Sunday 20th August, although it wasn’t until a couple of months ago that Mom was given a date for surgery. However, prior to this I had to put in place provision for my care needs. This involved recruiting a second carer and ensuring I have all the equipment I would need.

For the past 4 months I have searched for a second carer. I advertised everywhere and anywhere – newspapers, news agents, local shops and the post office, job sites, Facebook and so on. The response has really surprised and frustrated me – so many no-shows, let downs and people failing to read or understand the basic job specification.

I ask very little of applicants. I don’t request references, qualifications, experience or even a CRB/DBS (criminal records check). I interview informally in my own home, and with employees I am flexible, easy going and more than fair, taking into consideration their individual circumstances.

However, despite the fact I am completely non-ambulatory, I have never used a hoist. Thus far, family and carers have always preferred to lift me manually as it’s much quicker and frankly less faff! I’m only tiny – approximately 5 feet tall and 5.5 stone in weight. So until very recently, it has always suited to go without a hoist.

Understandably this is off-putting to potential applicants. But, every carer I’ve ever employed has openly admitted that working for me is a breeze compared to any other job they’ve had, and that for them the lifting is a non-issue. Nevertheless, I appreciate that most would prefer not to lift – that’s fair enough.

Hoists

With this in mind, I instigated the process of applying for a ceiling track hoist to be installed in my ground-floor bedroom/ensuite bathroom. I will need a H-frame in the bathroom and a short track from my bed to the bathroom.

Not a huge ask really, particularly as I have never received any support in the way of equipment. Everything I have – wheelchairs, bed, bath lift etc. has been self-funded. The post-code lottery is a very real and unjust thing, people! But that’s a topic for another day…

Dealing with Community Occupational Therapists

I contacted the community Occupational Therapists, explained the situation and requested a needs assessment. I was initially fobbed off with the excuse that they’re vastly understaffed and that I would need to be terminally ill in order to qualify. When I asked how they suggest I manage after Mom’s operation, the OT replied that I should “camp out” and be dressed, bathed and toileted on my bed!

Disgusted at her casual disregard, I asked how she would feel having all her personal care needs carried out on the bed she sleeps in. “Oh well, this is the situation we’re in. It can’t be helped”, was her insensitive response.

I then contacted my neuromuscular consultant who wrote a letter of support. On receipt of this letter, the OT’s suddenly found time to carry out a needs assessment in my home – shocker! (It’s not what you know, but who you know, right!?)

Following this, two reps – one from TPG, the other from Prism Medical – came and measured up in order to provide quotes for the ceiling hoist. I have since learned that the second quote is unusable, which frankly is no surprise, as he clearly had no clue what he was doing; at one point asking to see the gas meter. Even the OT who accompanied him questioned his experience.

In the meantime I have been issued with a portable hoist, though it has taken many weeks to receive a usable sling. Rather than measuring me, then visiting me in my home with a variety of slings to try, the OT’s insisted on sending one at a time. After much harassment from me, a community OT finally conceded and actually attended to properly assess me for a sling.

Honestly, they complain that they have a backlog of work and no time, and yet they waste so much. The sling issue could have been carried out in one appointment. Simple, done, move on. But instead, they chose to drag it out for weeks simply because they wouldn’t visit or listen to the patient.

And now…

Today is Sunday 10th September, and no further progress has been made with the ceiling hoist. Yet again I will have to chase the OT’s, otherwise nothing will ever happen. Sad but true.

I had taken on a second carer who began shadowing at the beginning of August. She was very enthusiastic, supportive and accommodating – said all the right things. Then whilst on my way to visit mom in the hospital, two days after her surgery, I received a message from the new carer, who was due to work that evening. She issued a stream of excuses as to why she couldn’t (translate: wouldn’t) do the job.

Until then, my current carer had always been present. Essentially it turns out she was happy to come and get paid to watch someone else do the job. She just didn’t want to have to do any work herself. Now I know why she’s had so many jobs!

So, as it stands I am managing as best I can with my one part-time PCA, though she is planning to leave in late October to train as a paramedic; thus posing yet another obstacle.

Having realised how long this post is, I think I will leave it there for today, though there is much more to tell. Suffice to say, the saga continues…

6 thoughts on “Life Update ~ Carers, Hoists and OT’s”

  1. What a shambles! A case of left hand doesn’t know what right hands doing. I am appalled at the way the community OTs handled the moving and handling issue while your mums in hospital and otherwise recovering. You should put in a formal complaint to be honest. How dare they suggest you basically stay in bed until your Mum is fit enough to take on your care again. Absolutely disgusting and I can only imagine how that made you feel. Please do a follow up blog on the Hoist and PAs
    situation. I’m so angry for you Carrie-Ann

    1. Hi Fi, thanks so much for your support! Yes, a few people have urged me to make a formal complaint. I think I need to. There’s just the worry that it will rub them up the wrong way & delay the process further.
      I will definitely do a follow-up blog! Thanks so much for taking the time to read my ramblings x

    2. Fi is right. You should put in a formal complaint. Get a petition going – I’ll be the first to sign it!
      I am also angry for you Carrie-Ann.

      1. Thank you Alison! I really appreciate your support – it means the world.

        It’s times like these that leave disabled people like me, feeling isolated, abandoned and cast aside by the authorities.
        So to receive messages like yours helps to keep me going!

        I will put in a formal complaint. Something needs to change. If no one speaks up then nothing will ever change.
        Thanks again!

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