Flu | The Facts

Influenza (flu) is a highly contagious and potentially life-threatening virus. The symptoms can develop very quickly and, in some cases, lead to more serious illnesses like bronchitis and pneumonia. It is so important to get vaccinated as soon as the flu season begins (before December ~ UK).

Who is eligible for a free NHS flu jab?

– Aged 65 and over
– Pregnant
– Weakened immune system
– Certain medical conditions e.g. asthma, COPD, diabetes, heart disease, neurological disease
– Carers
– Family members of/living with immunocompromised individuals
– Living in a long-stay residential care home facility
– Frontline health and social care workers
– Children over the age of 6 months with a long-term health condition
– Children 2 years +

Flu Facts:

– Up to 1/3 of flu deaths are in healthy people.
– Public Health England estimate that an average 8,000 people die from flu in England each year, although the figure can be much higher.
– The vaccine is thoroughly tested and has an excellent safety record. The most common side effect is mild soreness around the injection site.
– Getting your flu jab EVERY YEAR is the best way to protect yourself and those around you.
– You won’t be protected against any new strains of flu that may circulate each year unless you are vaccinated every year. Also, the protection from the vaccine declines over time.
– The risk of having a serious (anaphylactic) reaction to the flu jab is much lower than the risk of getting seriously ill from the flu itself.

Related Blog Posts:

Flu Jab: Get Yours Today!

Cough & Cold Season | Chest Infection

Winter | Top Tips to Keep Warm

Winter | Top Tips to Stay Well

Guest Post | Hypothermia Prevention

Today I bring you another guest post from Michael Leavy, Managing Director of Home Healthcare Adaptations, a family-run company that specialises in adapting homes for the elderly and less abled.

Michael kindly provided a previous guest post, (How Seniors Can Feel More Secure At Home), which you can view here.

Infographic | How to prevent hypothermia in older people

The risk of hypothermia is at its highest during the winter months. That risk is even greater for elderly people, as their lower metabolic rate makes it harder for their bodies to retain an ideal temperature. Also, they might not detect extreme cold as readily as others, and could have chronic medical conditions which would exacerbate the onset of hypothermia.

If you see signs of hypothermia in an elderly relative, keep them as warm as possible. If the situation seems serious, call NHS 111 for expert advice and guidance.


The infographic below from Home Healthcare Adaptations explains what to do if you think someone is experiencing hypothermia, along with preventative measures they can take to reduce the likelihood of hypothermia.

The harsh winter months affect a high population of the UK with a spate of Flu and other seasonal illnesses. But for the elderly and immobile, freezing conditions can lead to far more serious conditions requiring hospitalisation.

Elderly people are generally at greater risk of hypothermia than most others for several reasons. Their lower metabolic rate makes it harder for their bodies to regulate temperature in cold weather, while the presence of chronic health conditions reduces their immunity to hypothermia. Also, a deterioration in the senses could make it more difficult for an elderly person to detect decreases in temperature, hence they might not take immediate preventative action.

If you have elderly/immobile relatives or neighbours, check in on them throughout the colder months to ensure they aren’t showing any warning signs of hypothermia.

Symptoms of hypothermia include:

  • A rapid deterioration in physical appearance.
  • Extreme shivering or an occurrence of sudden, inexplicable body movements.

If you notice any of these in an elderly person during cold weather, call 999 straight away and, while waiting for the emergency services to arrive, move them to a warm place and wrap them in a warm blanket or coat.

Don’t put them in a warm bath or give them an alcoholic or caffeinated beverage!

Flu Jab: Get Yours Today!

Well, it’s upon us again; Flu season is here. Every year my family and I get the Influenza vaccination, which is free of charge here in the UK, courtesy of the NHS.

For as long as I can remember, I’ve had the Flu jab to protect myself through the harsh winter months. It’s important that not only I am vaccinated, but that those closest to me are too. My immune system is much weaker than average, and my condition makes it considerably more difficult to overcome respiratory infections. For me, a common cold can quickly develop into something much more serious. It’s therefore very important that I am not unnecessarily exposed to the Flu virus.

As I have aged, my declining respiratory function has become the most concerning symptom of my disability. Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy causes muscle degeneration and scoliosis. Not only are my lungs squashed and unable to expand as they should, the muscles that make them force air in and out are slowly wasting away.

Over the years, I have fought recurrent chest infections, several bouts of pneumonia, pleurisy and an acute pneumothorax (collapsed lung), requiring a chest drain. Many long, drawn-out days have been spent in hospital trying to overcome serious complications resulting from respiratory viruses.

For this reason, I implore and encourage you all to go and get the Flu shot. It takes no time at all and I promise you, it’s completely painless. There are fables floating around that will attempt to make you believe the Flu jab can give you the Flu. This is not the case at all. Yes, the vaccine does contain a small dose of the inactive virus. This triggers antibodies, which within two weeks will protect you, if and when you’re exposed to seasonal Flu.

Like all viruses, there are various strains of Influenza which change annually. For this reason, it is essential to ensure you are vaccinated every year.

I visited my local pharmacy, without appointment, a few weeks ago to get my free vaccination. If you haven’t already, please don’t delay. Go and get yours NOW!

For more information on the Influenza vaccine visit the NHS web page here.


Related Blog Posts:

Flu | The Facts

Winter | Top Tips to Keep Warm

Winter | Top Tips to Stay Well

Cough & Cold Season | Chest Infection