Interview | Emmerdale Actor James Moore

Award-winning ITV Soap Emmerdale recently cast a disabled actor in a pivotal role, placing him at the forefront of a major, developing storyline. Newcomer, 25 year-old James Moore from Cheltenham, Gloucestershire has cerebral palsy. His debut as Ryan Stocks, the long-lost son of Charity Dingle, has been met with universal praise and applause.

The scene-stealer instantly endeared viewers with glimpses of a multi-dimensional character and an attitude to match his onscreen mother’s. Some even say there is a convincing physical resemblance between the two.

Ryan (James Moore) and on-screen mother Charity Dingle (Emma Atkins)

Engaging opening scenes indicate that Ryan is set to be a strong presence; witty, outspoken and unfiltered. Furthermore, his connection with the prominent Dingle family suggests that he is not destined to become a background, token disabled character. On the contrary, Ryan Stocks will be a regular and crucial feature in future episodes.

Like many avid Emmerdale viewers, I was anxious to see who would be revealed as Charity Dingle’s son. To see a disabled actor playing the role is unexpected but as a disabled person myself, I am more than pleasantly surprised.

The casting of disabled actor James Moore is an exciting, encouraging and essential step forward in the inclusion and representation of disability within the media.


1. Hi James, could you please tell Disability Horizons readers about yourself?

So firstly, I have cerebral palsy, but it’s Ataxic CP which basically means that I struggle with movement and coordination. I struggle to walk long distances and there are certain things I know I can’t do, but I’ve adapted to these challenges in my day to day life.
I got into acting because even from a young age, I’ve always been interested in film and the theatre. I struggled with this for a long time because I didn’t know whether I would be able to make a career and earn a living from acting, considering that when I was growing up, there wasn’t many disabled people being represented on film or television.

2. As an actor with a disability, how does this lack of representation make you feel?

I think, in terms of the here and now, societies attitude to non-disabled actors playing disabled characters is too lenient. I mean, we wouldn’t let the blackface caricature continue to happen – this is deemed unacceptable. So why let able-bodied people take the roles of disabled characters?
In order to ‘normalise’ disability on screen, we first have to find disabled actors and give them opportunities rather than taking roles and opportunities away from them. I think that is the biggest and most important step.
This is why I love being a part of Emmerdale – they are showing disability in a new light and letting viewers know that we (disabled people) can be independent and have full, healthy lives. Together we’re proving that disability isn’t a defining factor.

3. What, if any, challenges have you faced in your career due to your disability?

I have faced some challenges but it comes with the territory. At the end of the day, I would most likely have to play a disabled character and they are not easy to come by.
I guess my challenges a lot of the time stem from self doubt, as well as lack of opportunity. There aren’t really a lot of roles for disabled people and so it can sometimes be hard to foresee a lengthy career in the industry.

4. How did the role at Emmerdale come about? Was it always intended that a disabled actor would play the role?

After I got my agent the role came up almost straight away and I really put my all into it. It was always intended for a disabled actor, but not specifically my disability (cerebral palsy). It was incredible how they wrote that in later and they asked me in great depth about my disability and my experiences with it.

5. Your opening scenes with Emma Atkins, who plays Charity, were incredibly impactful. What feedback have you received so far?

The feedback I’ve had so far has been amazing – everyone is so nice! My Twitter is blowing up and all of the feedback I received has been overwhelmingly positive. In that sense I’ve been really lucky.
Some people who have seen me on TV have asked for my advice. To them and any other aspiring disabled actors out there, I would say don’t give up! Take every opportunity you can; do street plays, student films and whatever else it takes. Also take the time to find the right agent – one who you think will be an asset to your career.

6. What does the future hold for your character, Ryan Stocks?

I can’t go into great detail on the future of Ryan, but there’s great humour, unlikely friendships, and gripping drama yet to come. The script is fantastic and so well written and I’m so glad that I can provide an adequate voice for this brilliant character.


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Interview | Daniel Baker

Disabled Actor

Daniel Baker is a first-time actor who landed the role of a man with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, in the primetime BBC1 drama, Requiem. Most notably, Daniel himself has the condition.

Muscular Dystrophy UK contacted Daniel after the production team specifically set out to cast someone with the disability. He appears in the psychological thriller, alongside Brendan Coyle, best known as John Bates from Downton Abbey.

The newcomer, from Cheltenham, is one of the few men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy to reach his forties. Here, he talks openly about life with a muscle-wasting condition, tells all about his debut acting experience, and shares his views on able-bodied actors portraying disabled characters.


1. Could you please tell us a little about yourself and your disability?

I am a 43 year-old man with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. I had a fairly normal childhood until the final years of primary school, when I could no longer walk and had to start using a wheelchair. I attended mainstream schools, followed by university. After university my condition worsened and I was given a ventilator to help me breathe. Due to this and some medication which caused negative side effects such as panic attacks, I ended up being bed-bound for nearly ten years. However, I eventually managed to control my anxiety. Then, after raising the funds for a new powered wheelchair, I faced the outside world again.

Duchenne is a condition where muscles get progressively weaker over time. We usually end up in a wheelchair by our early teens and require ventilation in our twenties. Although things have progressed medically, life expectancy is still in the 20’s. Some of us are living far longer than this, but sadly it’s still rare.

I try to live as normal a life as possible, and although there are always going to be limitations, I push myself and use technology to find ways around them. I manage to get out most days to either explore my hobby of photography or just walk my dogs. The dogs have their leads attached to my wheelchair so I can actually walk them myself. I still need someone with a pooper-scooper following me though as I can’t reach to do that job!

2. You achieved a BSc(Hons) in Applied Physics from Oxford Brookes University. How was your university experience in terms of inclusivity and disability awareness?

I attended university and got a government grant to pay for everything. I also received another grant called the Snowdon Award, which paid for travelling and a carer to help me. Nowadays things look much harder for anyone wanting to attend university and I doubt I would have been able to afford it myself.

I decided to commute each day as living on campus and finding accessible accommodation would have been very difficult for me. The journey varied between an hour and two hours each way, and though this was very tiring, it gave me chance to read text books and revise while in the car.

One consequence of not living closer was that I missed out on the social aspect of university life. I wasn’t overly bothered at the time as I’ve always liked my own company and was really there just to learn. But now when I look back, I think more socialising may have done me good.

The university itself was fairly accessible. There was one lift that was tiny and would break down on occasion, necessitating me being carried down stairs in my wheelchair- not a pleasant experience!

As I studied physics, I did need help performing the experiments, though luckily most lab work was done in groups so it wasn’t a big issue. The staff were always helpful and treated me like any other student. I can’t really complain about the inclusiveness and accessibility at all. Yes, some things could have been better, like having more accessible toilets. But overall it was a good experience and I’m grateful to have had that opportunity.

3. You recently featured in 2 episodes of Requiem (congratulations!) How was this experience and what challenges did you face as a disabled actor?

Daniel with actor and co-star, Brendan Coyle

Appearing in Requiem was an amazing experience! I had never acted in any fashion before, other than primary school plays where I usually hid in the background. So the whole experience was something new to me and pushed my boundaries – something I try to do as much as possible these days.

I think the casting process was likely a lot easier due to my disability. They were looking for someone with my specific condition and there aren’t that many of us around. I sent a few headshots and pictures of myself, then chatted with the production team over email. I was offered the part within a couple of days.

Daniel at Aston Hall in Birmingham

As for difficulties, I think they probably aren’t the things people would expect or think about. As soon as the offer of a role came up, I had to check that my personal assistant would be available and flexible to take me. I had to think about transport and did some research to find which trains had the best accessible carriages without any changes. I even did a test run the week before filming just to make sure everything would go smoothly. I had long chats with the production team to ensure the correct equipment, like a portable hoist, would be available on the day. They were very thorough and wanted to make sure I was safe and comfortable. This is something most actors wouldn’t need to even think or worry about.

I was extremely lucky to be working with a great team on Requiem. They ensured I had my own room on set, organised taxis and sent a runner to meet me at the train station. They also had a medic check my needs on set in case of emergency, and made sure the set itself was accessible.

The day itself was perfect. Everyone (cast and crew) welcomed me into their family and I felt right at home. I didn’t feel nervous at all and the scenes were all shot in one take, which I think really impressed them. I felt just like any other actor – I was treated as one of the team and not “special”.

4. As a disabled actor yourself, how do you feel about able-bodied actors portraying disabled characters on stage and on screen?

I think it depends on context and certain circumstances. Sometimes it is probably necessary, especially when the condition being portrayed is progressive, and when a good actor who has done plenty of research plays the part it can work well.

In general though, I think disabled actors playing the parts of disabled characters is a lot more authentic and should be done as much as possible. We have skills and knowledge that could be invaluable to the production team.

There is also the aspect of showing disability to society so we are more accepted and understood. This can’t really be achieved unless the actor is disabled themselves. The more we (disabled people) are on screen and included in mainstream media the better.

5. What advice would you give to others like yourself, who are living with a muscle-wasting condition?

I would use the old cliché, ‘live every day to the fullest’, because you never know what is going to happen tomorrow. I take risks everyday. For example, if my ventilator stops working while out, I’m in big trouble!

But we need to just get on with life and not worry about every possible risk, otherwise we would be stuck inside doing nothing. This can and does lead to depression, which I have experienced myself.

Having said that, I do believe that people in a similar position as me should embrace and be proud of their internal strength and determination. Yes, we face an uncertain future, most without hope for a cure and declining health. But this gives us an advantage over able-bodied people – we are used to overcoming adversity and major obstacles in life.

Life with Duchenne muscular dystrophy isn’t easy! Maintaining happiness and finding enjoyment in things is an every day struggle. It can be incredibly frustrating too.

There are days I wish I could get myself up, washed and dressed. I would drive my van to the woods, venture to where it would be impossible for a wheelchair to go, and just be alone, listening to nature.

For people like me with a muscle-wasting condition, it isn’t a simple life. There are many things we won’t experience, so I would advise you make the most of what you can do and take advantage of every opportunity.

Some things I have done, like appearing on a primetime BBC drama, most ‘normal’ people will never get to experience.


Daniel features in episodes 4 and 6 of the BBC drama Requiem. The whole series can now be found on the BBC iPlayer.

Daniel is also a trustee for the charity DMD Pathfinders. View his IMDB page here, and find out more from the man himself by visiting his personal blog.


I’d like to thank Daniel for taking the time to speak with me and answer my questions.

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Breathe | Film Review

Admittedly, I was unaware of the pioneering disability advocate Robin Cavendish prior to the release of Breathe, a much anticipated biopic starring Andrew Garfield. Thankfully, this important figure’s story is sympathetically portrayed with charm, decency and humour in Andy Serkis’s directorial debut. 


The film brings to attention the life and achievements of one of Britain’s longest-lived responauts – Robin Cavendish (Garfield) who, at the age of 28, became paralysed from the neck down after contracting polio. Unable to breathe for himself, he was kept alive for almost forty years by a mechanical respirator.

The real Robin Cavendish with son Jonathan

We are first introduced to the handsome, sporty and awfully posh tea-broker in late 1950s England, where he meets and falls in love with the equally posh Diana, affectingly played by Claire Foy. The blissfully happy couple marry and relocate to Nairobi where Diana announces she is pregnant. Life was good and seemingly limitless.

Struck down only a year into their marriage, Robin and Diana are told curtly by doctors that he will survive no more than a few months. Confined to his hospital bed, Robin wished for death, mouthing to his brothers-in-law the words ‘let me die’. Depressed and resentful, he spits in the face of a hospital chaplain who suggests his suffering is part of God’s plan.

A helplessly devoted Diana asks what she can do, to which her husband responds, “Get me out of here”. Choosing to courageously risk death rather than submit to merely exist, hidden away as a patient for the remainder of his days, Robin was the first to pave the way for all other incarcerated disabled individuals. He determinedly pursued life, freedom, social integration and acceptance.

Opposing contemporary medical convention, the Cavendishes defiantly leave the hospital constraints in a blaze of glory, ignoring a disgruntled doctor who calls after them, “You’ll be dead in two weeks!”

Upon their exit they pass by two women who comment that it’s “not right” and “cruel” even, for “them” to be out and seen in public. This brief dialogue epitomizes the narrow-minded medical and social prejudice towards the severely disabled population, at the time.

The remainder of the film chronicles Robin’s fight to challenge such perceptions, whilst also pushing the boundaries of possibility. Not only does he succeed in changing attitudes, he was instrumental in making revolutionary practical advancements, thus effectively changing the lives of thousands of disabled people worldwide.

With the assistance of Oxford professor and inventor Teddy Hall (Hugh Bonneville), Robin develops a wheelchair that incorporates a ventilator, allowing him the freedom to venture beyond four walls, which he does with gusto.

A particularly funny episode involves a family holiday to Spain, during which Robin’s electrical respirator blows up, leaving him, Diana, their son and Diana’s brother stranded on a dusty layby. Not so funny, you might think. But the interaction that follows adds much needed light-relief.

While wife and son keep a jovial Robin breathing with the aid of a bag respirator, Tom Hollander’s character goes in search of a phone to call Teddy Hall back in England. The group then set up camp and attract a local crowd who party with them until Teddy makes a comical arrival on the scene.

As in life, there are moments of heart-breaking despair adding shade to the sunny optimism and whimsical jollity throughout. In one such scene, Diana presents photos of their former life in Nairobi to young son Jonathan who asks, “Can we go to Africa, Daddy?”

Unable to explain his plight to the youngster, he stifles tears of anguish as a watery-eyed Diana can say only, “I’m so sorry”. “So am I”, Robin softly replies.

Some years later, Robin teams up with Doctor Clement Aitken and together they tour Europe, demonstrating the custom made wheelchair. Particularly shocking is their visit to a German hospital where disabled patients are maintained in what looks like a futuristic, white-washed morgue. If you didn’t know this is a true story, you wouldn’t believe it.

The film, which on the whole is a little too rose-tinted, benefits from stark, impactful reminders of the ways disabled people were viewed, treated and constricted. However, it lacks detail and grit, failing to depict the daily grind of real life, the mental strain and tensions within relationships.
While the central performances are commendable, they fail to achieve the same conviction and reaction as those of Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones in the comparable The Theory of Everything (2014).

Nevertheless, Breathe no doubt remains an inspiring tribute to the highly influential innovator Robin Cavendish and his triumph over adversity. His story has been realised with love, affection and sincerity, quite literally since the producer, Jonathan Cavendish, is his son.

*This article can also be found on the Muscular Dystrophy Trailblazers website.*


You might also be interested to read:

My Interview with disabled actor Daniel Baker, who has Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

My Interview with Emmerdale Actor James Moore, who has cerebral palsy

My Top 10 Disabled Celebs | The Girls

The Girls:

My latest article for Disability Horizons showcases my pick of the top 10 disabled FEMALE celebrities. Because, in the wise words of Beyonce, girls run the world!

*Last year, Disability Horizons compiled their top 10 disabled celeb’s, including both men and women. To avoid repetition, I have not included any of the women from that previous article.


There is a great deal of ongoing discussion and debate around the inclusion and representation of disabled people within the media. Put simply, there is not enough diversity. Still, in 2017, the vast majority of British ‘celebrities’ are able-bodied.

However, we are seeing the emergence of more and more disabled people on our television screens and in the public eye. But, how many can you name? When contemplating this very question, I realised that most of those who immediately came to mind were male – Stephen Hawking, Warwick Davies, Alex Brooker, Adam Hills, Ade Adepitan and Jonnie Peacock, to name a few.

So what about the ladies?…


Hannah Cockroft MBE

Hannah, who has cerebral palsy, suffered two cardiac arrests within 48 hours of birth, which affected two parts of her brain. She was left with balance, mobility and fine motor impairment.

But this has most certainly not held her back. She is a gold medal-winning Paralympic wheelchair racer and 10 times world champion. In 2012 she became the first Paralympian to break a world record in the London Olympic Stadium for the 100 metres T34.

In 2014 she won the Sport Relief edition of Strictly Come Dancing with professional dancer Pasha Kovalev. That same year she launched 17 Sports Management Limited, a company representing disabled athletes.

Hannah continued her reign of success at the 2016 Paralympics in Rio where she won three gold medals.

Katie Piper

The victim of a vicious acid attack in March 2008, Katie has endured more than 250 surgical procedures to date. She suffered full-thickness burns (where both layers of the skin are destroyed) and had to wear a face mask for 23 hours every day. She also swallowed some of the sulphuric acid, damaging her throat, and was blinded in her left eye.

In 2009, the former model shared her horrific ordeal in the Channel 4 documentary Katie: My Beautiful Face. She also established the Katie Piper Charitable Foundation, which supports those with severe burns and disfigurement injuries.

In addition, she is now a successful author, television presenter, magazine columnist and philanthropist. An inspiration to many, Katie married in 2015 and is currently expecting her second child.

Cerrie Burnell

Cerrie was born with no right forearm and is severely dyslexic. Since childhood, she has always refused to wear a prosthesis or hide her disability.

An all-round entertainer, Cerrie is an accomplished actress, singer, playwright, children’s author and TV presenter. Between 2002-2008, she appeared in Holby City, Eastenders, Grange Hill, The Bill and Comedy Lab. She then transitioned to presenting, working on The One Show, The Wright Stuff and CBeebies (Jan 2009 – April 2017).

But her first appearance on children’s television was met with controversy. Some claimed that the presence of someone with a physical disability like hers could scare young viewers. In response, Cerrie spoke candidly about her disability and how it’s important that children are exposed to differences, for which she was widely applauded.

She now regularly speaks out in favour of diversity and the inclusion of disabled people in the media. In fact, she recently took part in the Channel 4 documentary Diverse NationShe’s since reached an even wider audience by presenting all the swimming events for the Channel 4 and the 2012 Paralympics.

Named by The Observer as one of the top 10 children’s presenters of all time, Cerrie has also been declared, by The Guardian, as one of Britain’s 100 most inspirational women.

A supporter of many charities including body-confidence organisation Body Gossip, Cerrie now wants to focus on writing more children’s books and acting.

Francesca Martinez

Critically-acclaimed stand-up comedian Francesca Martinez first became prominent playing Rachel Burns in Grange Hill (1994-8). Since, she has starred in BBC shows Holby City, Doctors and Extras.

But it’s not her acting that she’s most well known for, it’s her comedy. With a self-deprecating sense of humour, Francesca, who has cerebral palsy, describes herself as “wobbly”. In 2000 she became the first female to win the prestigious Daily Telegraph Open Mic Award at the Edinburgh Festival. She was also named one of the 50 funniest acts in British comedy by The Observer.

Also a campaigner and activist, Francesca has organised many charity shows and is a patron of several charities, including Evenbreak, which helps pair disabled people with inclusive employers. She’s also an outspoken opponent of government welfare reform, in 2012 launching the campaign War on Welfare (WOW), which called for an end to disability benefit cuts. She later secured the first parliamentary debate for disabled people by disabled people.

In 2013 she won the Public Affairs Achiever of the Year Award and the following year was named one of Britain’s most influential women.

Her recent sell-out comedy tour was followed by a best-selling book, both titled WHAT THE **** IS NORMAL?! She is currently working on a feature documentary of the same name.

Cherylee Houston

Screen and theatre actress Cherylee was diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome type III (EDS) at the age 23. She has appeared in Doctors, The Bill, Holby City, Emmerdale and Little Britain.

Her most recent role is that of Izzy in Coronation Street, which she has played since 2010, and is the soap’s first disabled character to be played by a disabled actor.

Aside from acting, Cherylee established the Manchester-based youth project TripleC, which aims to make drama accessible to all. She has spoken out about a number of political issues too, including the Conservative cuts to disability benefits and the representation of disability in the media. She also continues to raise awareness of EDS.

Anne Hegerty

Better known as The Governess in the award-winning ITV quiz show The ChaseAnne has a form of autism. In 2005, after watching a documentary about Asperger’s Syndrome and identifying with the symptoms, Anne told her doctors she believes she has the disability. It took two years for her to be officially diagnosed, during which time she lost her job as a proof-reader, due to her inability to multi-task.

Unable to pay her bills, Anne was confronted by bailiffs on New Year’s Day in 2008. She later sought advice and assistance and is to this day in receipt of Disability Living Allowance. Around the same time, her social worker encouraged her to audition for The Chase and even paid her travel costs to get there.

She is now a highly successful television personality and professional quizzer, have participated in Mastermind, Fifteen to One and Brain of Britain. Anne also talks candidly about her life with Asperger’s Syndrome and how it affects her.

Jess Thom

Jess, a comedian and public speaker, was diagnosed with the neurological condition Tourette Syndrome in her early twenties, and also uses a wheelchair. She’s most widely recognised for her memorable appearance on Russell Howard’s Good News in October 2015. The interview garnered much attention and has subsequently been viewed more than 600,000 times on Youtube – you can check it out in our article on 10 awesome disability-related videos.

In 2010 she co-founded Touretteshero, a blog that documents what it’s like living with Tourettes, featuring articles and videos. Its first production, Backstage in Biscuit Land (2014), met with critical acclaim. It has since toured nationally and internationally.

She has appeared on various television and radio programs including The Late Late Show, This Morning and Fry’s Planet Word. In 2013 she also delivered a TED talk about the misconceptions of Tourette’s and the creative potential of tics. While admitting her Tourette’s presents challenges and has been met with discrimination, she prefers to “celebrate [its] creativity and humour.”

Jess is an outspoken advocate and campaigner for disabled people’s rights. Her work often draws attention to the environmental and social barriers that prevent inclusion. An opponent of the medical model of disability, Jess insists her Tourette’s is a source of creativity, her wheelchair allows her freedom, and she is disabled not by her body but by the inaccessible environment.

Libby Clegg

Libby is a Scottish Paralympic champion sprinter, having won gold and broken records. She has a deteriorating condition Stargardt’s macular dystrophy, leaving her with only slight peripheral vision in her left eye. She is registered blind and is an ambassador for the Royal Blind Charity.

She has represented Great Britain in the T12 100m and 200m races at the 2008 Summer Paralympics, and the T11 100m and 200m in 2016 at the Paralympic Games in Rio. She is also the 2012 IPC European Champion and 2013 IPC World Champion.

As if she isn’t busy enough, Libby is also a course tutor and ambassador for Ability Training (ability-training.com), offering accredited disability specific awareness courses for sports coaches and fitness professionals.

Along with her beloved guide dog Hattie, she is helping to educate dog owners on the importance of nutrition and health. Libby raises awareness of the essential part guide dogs play in the lives of those with visual impairment.

She was recently honoured in the 2017 New Year’s honours service when she was appointed MBE for her contribution to sport.

Sarah Gordy

Award winner Sarah, who has Down’s Syndrome, is best known for her role as Lady Pamela Holland in the 2010 BBC TV series Upstairs Downstairs. She has also appeared in Holby City, Call the Midwife and Doctors, as well as various short films, radio dramas, commercials and many theatre productions.

She most recently portrayed Orlando Quine in the BBC series Strike: The Silkworm, based on the books by J.K. Rowling.

She is an ambassador for Mencap and patron of Circus Starr, a performance group that does shows for disabled children. When not acting, she volunteers at her local British Heart Foundation charity shop.

Genevieve Barr

Star of the latest Maltesers advert, Genevieve was born deaf. Having never learned sign language, she lip reads, and is, in fact, a professional lip-reader for different organisations.

She had a major role in the 2010 BBC drama The Silence, and the previous year played a deaf nurse in the Channel 4 comedy, The Amazing Dermot. Following her Bafta and International Emmy Award nominations for The Silence, she went on to act in the BBC3 drama series The Fades, and Shameless on Channel 4.

A freelance disability consultant and public speaker, Genevieve works with the charities Hear the WorldAction on Hearing Loss and AFASIC – a charity for children with speech, language and communication difficulties. She also runs courses and workshops for disabled actors.


What do you think of my choices? Who would be in your top 10?

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