Guest Post | 7 Tips to Live a Confident Life Through Your Disability

Author: Jamie Costello

It’s fair to say that one of the biggest challenges of being born with a disability is that it can be difficult to be who you are without thinking of the physical condition that you’ve been born with. It’s not hard to understand why a disability can knock the confidence from you. Many individuals can find it difficult to adjust to life that requires a major change to their day to day routines and tasks. This can make it more difficult for an individual with a disability to feel confident in themselves. However, some useful insights may be useful in picking up your confidence and helping you for the future.

1. Don’t live up to the expectations others have of you

When people look at those with a disability or injury, they tend to have pretty low expectations of you because of how you look or the disadvantage that you may have. But their judgements are wrong about you. You may have a lot to juggle on your plate such as school or work and you’ll need to learn new skills that can help you to adapt with your disability. But in learning these it will definitely help you for the future. Essentially, don’t let your disability bring you down and don’t be afraid to try new things.

2. Don’t compare yourself to something else

Everybody has aspirations and you shouldn’t let any condition you have prevent you from reaching them. There’s nothing wrong with being ambitious but also be realistic about your future goals. You know what you’re capable of and you’re sure able to do it. Don’t let others influence this.

3. Doctors don’t necessarily know everything

Medical professionals do a fantastic job and their skills are to be admired in what they do, but there can be occasions where they don’t necessarily have all the answers that you’re looking for. You know yourself pretty well and there will be others around you who know you pretty well too. Don’t let the advice of doctors get you down and in some cases, consider doing what you think is right as it can normally be the right decision.

4. Be open to bringing in new people

Due to your circumstances, it’s likely that you’ll come across and be introduced to new people in wonderful ways. It may form some of your greatest friendships but at the same time, you may come across some people who will find it difficult to accept you. Don’t let this get you down and force yourself to get them to like you. Stick with the people who feel comfortable with you and you feel comfortable with.

5. Others may be afraid to be honest with you

People around you may have a feeling of sensitivity around you and the fear that they may hurt your feelings. A lot of positive comments is great to hear and can be great for your self-esteem, but at the same time it might not be a great help. You’d also want people around you who speak honestly with you and they’re more likely being that way to benefit you. The majority of the time, they’ll be the one that you want to go back to for further advice and perspective.

6. Don’t be too critical of yourself

Consider the situation that you’re in and how there are very few people who are in the same boat. The fact you’re continuing to enjoy life even though you have a disability already shows good character. Be confident in the fact that you’re knowledgeable on elements of life that others have no clue about. The qualities that you have as a person are the majority of what’s needed to get by in life.

7. Continue to exercise and keep hydrated

Do whatever it takes to remain active. Consider taking up sports that are adaptive to those with disabilities, and save yourself from being a couch potato. It can help to mentally improve your wellbeing.

Self-esteem and confidence is a large issue in today’s society, particularly when it comes to the impact it can have to your mental health too. When we think of other topics surrounding these issues, a big one being individuals resorting to cosmetic surgery to improve their appearance, a lot of these options are extremely unnecessary because regardless of the condition that you have or how you look, embracing who you are is always the best way to move forward and gain the confidence you deserve.

Guest Post | Employing Older Workers

Are Employers Doing Enough to Help with the Wellbeing of Older Workers?

The business world is going through a radical change to workforces right now. According to the Office of National Statistics (ONS), one in four workers in the UK is now aged over 50.

Research commissioned by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) found that from 2011 to 2014, the proportion of workers aged 50 and older rose from 21% to 24%. The same ONS survey estimated that, by 2030, the number of people in the UK aged 65 and older will have increased by 50%, while those aged 20 to 30 would see a 4% decline.

This figure may vary depending on a variety of circumstances including the location, industry, policies and more. One thing’s for sure though; these changes will have far-reaching consequences across society, including the workplace.

With this in mind, it’s even more important to acknowledge and invest in supporting the changing workforce. Organisations are now in competition for the best and most experienced staff.

In this article, we explore what this means for businesses. We identify areas where employers can further support their older workers and offer some tips for ensuring their wellbeing.

Older Workers and Wellbeing

Anyone that’s been in employment in the last five to ten years would no doubt have noticed the increased focus on employee wellbeing. It’s the trending buzzword relating to the health and safety of not only the physical but also the mental health of workers.

To keep your workforce happy (and by extension increase productivity), you should consider investing in both physical and mental support.

To achieve this for your older workers, you need to first consider what they need and want in the workplace. Research conducted by CIPD at the Centre for Ageing Better showed that just like younger workers, they’d also like a job that is meaningful, stimulating and sociable.

At the moment, older workers feel less appreciated compared to their younger counterparts. They’d like a job that’s not only flexible but also offers opportunities such as mentoring, training and career progression.

Benefits of Age Diversity

A study by Ageing Better shows employers report greater levels of loyalty, reliability and commitment from their older workers compared with younger colleagues. Their experience in life and in their sector places them in an ideal position to manage themselves and other members of staff.

According to a survey by CIPD, the number one benefit of age diversity in the workplace is knowledge-sharing. They found that 56% of HR decision-makers believe that older workers transfer vital knowledge and skills.

Having a diverse workforce, not only in age but also race, religion and (dis)ability can also help to solve complex work problems. By bringing a mix of ideas, skills, strengths, experiences and backgrounds, you’re ensuring that strengths and weaknesses are balanced.

Finally, because of the estimated increase of over 50 year-olds in the general population in the UK, age diversity in the workplace can help to match the profile of your customers which will, in turn, improve the product or services you offer.

4 Tips for Supporting Older Workers

Be open to flexibility: This is important to workers of all ages. It helps them to create a balance between their work and social life. Specifically, for older workers, it also provides a transition period to retirement. Remember to inform your staff of their right to make flexible working requests.

Mentoring: By allowing your older workers to mentor younger employers, they’re able to pass on their experience, work habits and attitudes towards work.

Training: Some employers are concerned about this investment because they worry that they’re investing in someone who may soon retire. However, it’s worth noting, training these workers means as well as keeping their skills sharp, they’ll be more employable.

Employee Assistance Programmes: As well as retirement benefits, you should also be supporting them while they’re still at your company. Offering employee assistance programmes gives workers access to support that’ll help them deal with personal problems that might impact their work performance or their health and wellbeing.

On top of all this, you should also be conducting regular one-to-one meetings to review their performance, offer feedback and keep on top of any issues.


My thanks to David Price from Health Assured for providing this guest post.

Guest Posts | All Articles

Since creating this blog in October 2016, I have been incredibly fortunate to write for various websites and organisations.

I am a Feature Writer for Disability Horizons, Co-Researcher with Living Life to the Fullest, and a long-time campaigner for Muscular Dystrophy Trailblazers.

Here is my entire catalogue of articles:


The first article I wrote for Disability Horizons lists my choice of ‘The Top Ten Apps for Disabled People’.

No matter what your disability, there’s an app out there that can assist you in some way. With the help of such technology, we the disabled community can make our lives that little bit easier.

New apps are being developed everyday. But for the time being, here are my recommendations.


For the past decade, I have been involved with Muscular Dystrophy Trailblazers. I wrote a piece about my life with Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, which you can read here.

The Channel 4 show The Undateables has proved highly controversial and divisive, particularly within the disabled community. Read my take on the debate here, which also features on the MD Trailblazers website.


 

  • For all my Muscular Dystrophy Trailblazers articles: click here

2009: My first involvement with Muscular Dystrophy Trailblazers.

 

  • For all my Disability Horizons articles: click here

  • For all my Disability Talk articles: click here

 

 

 

 

My interview with Disabled Living.

 


My interview with actor James Moore, for the March/April 2019 issue of Able Mag

Please follow me on Twitter and Facebook