World Toilet Day

19th November 2018 ~ #WorldToiletDay

I am 30 years old, and I have the progressive condition, Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. As a result, I am completely non-ambulant. I use a powered wheelchair and am unable to transfer without the use of a hoist and support from carers.

Imagine being denied the basic human need to go to the loo; being unable to access a toilet whenever you need to. Imagine having to hold in the urge all day, every day. Having no choice but to strictly limit your fluid intake to the point where you cannot risk drinking from morning until evening. Living with dehydration, impaired mental function and recurrent infections, simply because adequate toileting facilities are not made available to you.

#FitToBurst

This was my life until 2011, when I underwent medically unnecessary surgery to insert a suprapubic catheter. Of course, I didn’t want an operation, a General Anaesthetic (in itself a huge risk due to my poor lung function) or an indwelling catheter. By no means is this an easy fix, believe me! But I just couldn’t do it anymore; I was making myself ill and relied on assistance from others in order to carry out the seemingly simple task of toileting. No longer could I inflict undue stress on my body and mind.

So, I resigned myself to the only option available to me at that time; a suprapubic catheter. With this, I no longer need to transfer from my wheelchair or depend on other people. I don’t have to struggle and suffer the indignity of using small, dirty and ill-equipped public disabled toilets. But, 250,000 disabled people in the UK still do.

Often, there is not enough room to fit a wheelchair in a disabled toilet, let alone space to transfer, adjust clothing and accommodate a carer too. Baby changing facilities get in the way, grab rails are too few and carelessly installed, the toilets themselves are too low, and hoists…what hoists?!

The majority of disabled toilets I have used throughout my life have been vastly inadequate, filthy, often neglected or used for storage!

I think it’s important that there are Changing Places facilities everywhere, including smaller towns, villages and rurally as there are many disabled people (like me) resident in these locations too.

#incLOOsion

The lack of such essential facilities locally makes me feel restricted, excluded from society and considered less important.


The 19th July 2017 marked the second Changing Places Awareness Day and eleven years since the campaign began.

Each registered Changes Places toilet includes:

1. – a height adjustable adult-sized changing bench

2. – a tracking hoist system, or mobile hoist where not possible

3. – adequate space for the disabled person and up to two carers

4. – a centrally placed toilet with room either side

5. – a screen or curtain for privacy

6. – wide tear off paper roll to cover the bench

7. – a large waste bin for disposable pads

8. – a non-slip floor


Join the #RevoLOOtion!

My First Ceiling Hoist

As some of you may know, my very first ceiling track hoist was *finally* fitted on Monday 11th December.

I now have a straight track in my bedroom and a separate H-frame in my ensuite bathroom.

Why I need a ceiling hoist

I am 29 and completely non-ambulant due to Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. Being rather petite, I have always been manually transferred (yes, lifted by family and carers) rather than hoisted. This method has always been preferable since it’s much quicker and frankly less faff. But, we’re all getting older and more frail.

I live with my parents who are both in their 60s. They are my primary source of support, though I do employ a carer part-time. My mother underwent a full knee replacement in August 2017, and is therefore limited in how much she is able to help me. Consequently, we have reached a stage where a ceiling hoist is a necessity.

A long and frustrating process!

Back in October 2016, Mom was told she needed a full knee replacement. The following Spring, my only carer announced she would be leaving within the next few months to pursue a career as a paramedic. With this in mind, I contacted my local community occupatinal therapy team to request an assessment. I was told they’re vastly understaffed and, with an extensive waiting list, I would need to be in a terminal condition in order to be seen. I appreciate their predicament, I really do, but I was unwilling to be fobbed off so easily.

I was instructed, over the phone by an OT I had never met, to “camp out”, meaning I should wash, dress and be toileted on my bed. Yes, for a prolonged and indefinite period of time, I should go without a shower and simply not wash my hair. (Due to my physical limitations and my wheelchair, there’s no way I could wash my hair over the sink).

Disgusted at her casual disregard, I asked my neuromuscular consultant to issue a letter of support. On receipt of this, an OT suddenly found time to visit me in my home for an assessment. Following this, representatives from Prism Medical and TPG DisableAids attended separately to advise, measure up and draw plans. Both rep’s then submitted quotes to the purse holder at County Council who, of course, approved the cheapest option.

NB: A portable hoist was trialled but proved unusable with the layout of my room and the type of bath in situ.

Prism Medical

We were expecting Prism to arrive at 9am on 24th October 2017, as arranged. Having waited over an over with no sign of anyone, I called only to be told they weren’t coming because of a “technical issue”.

To cut a long story short, Prism claimed they couldn’t connect the track from my bedroom to that in my ensuite bathroom. This is despite consulting with occupational therapists and agreeing to do the job. Prism also claim they left telephone messages for both myself and the OT’s, on the previous Friday, to inform us that they wouldn’t be attending. Neither I, nor the community OT’s received any messages. I call bullshit!

Dad even removed the partition above the bathroom door in preparation.

Later, I learnt that Prism have similarly disappointed several others, resulting in formal complaints being issued against them. So when the purse holder at County Council told me she would renegotiate with Prism rather than approve funding for TPG to carry out the work, I insisted otherwise.

Having to fight for your rights and basic needs is, unfortunately, very much part and parcel of having a disability. ‘Tell, don’t ask!’ This is my motto. In my experience, if you are not clued-up and assertive, those in authority simply fob you off.

TPG DisableAids

Thankfully, Funding was approved after a different OT, accompanied by the rep from TPG, visited to discuss and re-evaluate the situation.

Rather than trying to connect the single rail in the bedroom to the H-frame in the ensuite bathroom, it was decided that two separate hoists would be best.

My carer had by then handed in her notice and would be leaving at the end of the month. I was seriously starting to worry the hoist would not be in place before Christmas.

But much to my relief, TPG (who, compared to Prism, were infinitely more professional and efficient throughout) booked in for the 4th December.

Then, just my luck, we were hit by the worst snow in 7 years! It was like flipping Narnia.

I tried to remain optimistic though in reality I knew there was no way TPG would be able to make the journey from Hereford. And they didn’t.

So, it was third time lucky, on the following Monday that the long-awaited ceiling hoist was installed. I no longer need to worry about hiring new carers as lifting is not an issue. Furthermore, the pressure is off Mom – literally! And, the thing I am perhaps the most happy about – my dealings with community OTs and the County Council are over.

For now at least…


(Apologies for the poor quality of the images. All were taken by myself on a Samsung S5!)

Life Update: Part 2

Carers and my first ceiling track hoist


Hey everyone, hope you’re all well.

As promised, here are the developments following on from my previous life update

Care

Having re-advertised for a part-time carer to replace my current PCA, I interviewed seven applicants, plus one who’s interested in ad-hoc cover. All were enthusiastic, though as any employer will know, things often change in the days that follow.

There was only one no-show which actually isn’t bad at all compared to my previous attempts to recruit new carers.

One of the seven ladies later asked to be a backup as she decided she couldn’t do every weekday. From the six remaining, I invited three to shadow, knowing that at least one would change their mind. I was right; they did.

The first was a no-show (yes, another)! After I contacted her to ask if she was going to attend, she simply replied, “I forgot”. Needless to say she was scrubbed from the list.

Number two messaged me a few days before shadowing, to say she had reconsidered and felt there weren’t enough hours. This left me with one applicant.

Thankfully she did show up. Seemingly reliable and keen to take on the role, I offered her the job on a trial basis from Monday 30th October.

My current PCA is leaving in December to pursue a career as a paramedic. So, fingers crossed all goes well with the newbie…

Ceiling track hoist

To my surprise, I was contacted a couple of weeks ago by Prism Medical to arrange a date for installation. Finally, after waiting for so long and constantly pushing the matter, I would get the much needed ceiling hoist on Tuesday 24th October.

In preparation, my Dad had to remove the glass intersection above my bathroom door to allow through-access.

Before:

After:


When the day arrived, we cleared the room and waited for the workmen to arrive, as expected, at 9am. An hour later and still no sign. Becoming impatient, I called Prism Medical but was told they wouldn’t be coming due to a technical issue.

What?! What technical issue?

Prism Medical claim they left a voice message, on the previous Friday, explaining they couldn’t connect the single rail going from my bed to the bathroom door, with the H-frame in the bathroom. We received no voice message. They also claim to have contacted the Community OT’s. They too have had no calls or messages from Prism.

A rep from Prism previously visited my home to take measurements, draw up plans and provide quotes. They then corresponded with a Community OT (or so I’m told) and agreed to install the ceiling track hoist. Yet despite all this, they have suddenly decided they’re unable to carry out the work. Excuse my language, but what the actual fuck?!

As you might expect, the remainder of Tuesday was spent on the phone: trying to get hold of an occupational therapist, complaining to and about Prism Medical, and negotiating with County Council Equipment Services.

I’m hoping to get funding approval for TPG to do the work, as they too had sent out a rep to provide a quote.

Naturally the County Council opted for the cheaper quote from Prism. That’s worked out really well, hasn’t it!

Final Thoughts

Today is Thursday 26th October. There has been no notable progress since Tuesday. Essentially, I am back to square one – harassing the OT’s daily to ensure my case is not ignored. Unless you constantly pursue the issue yourself, frankly nothing happens.

I am so angry and disappointed with the whole cock-up, though sadly not overly surprised. In my experience, unless you’re prepared to self-fund, this is the service (or lack thereof) you can expect!

I will be putting in a formal complaint and am seriously considering writing to my local MP. If we allow companies and organisations to get away with such failures and blatant disregard, nothing will change.

So, once again the saga continues. I will keep you updated – *Keep an eye on Twitter and my Facebook page*


Thank you so much to each and every one of you who has offered advice and support!

Life Update ~ Carers, Hoists and OT’s

Hi folks, I hope you are all healthy and happy.

I feel like it’s been a while since I blogged about the goings-on of my day-to-day life. Not a particularly exciting post, granted. But I thought it might be useful to share these ‘goings-on’ with you, as I’m sure there are some of you facing similar struggles.

I have for the past few months been occupied with life crap – specifically, disability-related life crap – which has meant that blogging has unfortunately had to take a backseat.

Righty right, I’ll try and keep it brief…

Care

As some of you may know, I live with my parents who are my primary source of support. I do have a part-time carer who I employ, but otherwise my Mom (yes, I say Mom vs Mum) is my main caregiver. Sadly she herself suffers with progressive osteoarthritis, and following exploratory surgery in October, it was decided that she needed a full knee replacement.

This in fact took place on Sunday 20th August, although it wasn’t until a couple of months ago that Mom was given a date for surgery. However, prior to this I had to put in place provision for my care needs. This involved recruiting a second carer and ensuring I have all the equipment I would need.

For the past 4 months I have searched for a second carer. I advertised everywhere and anywhere – newspapers, news agents, local shops and the post office, job sites, Facebook and so on. The response has really surprised and frustrated me – so many no-shows, let downs and people failing to read or understand the basic job specification.

I ask very little of applicants. I don’t request references, qualifications, experience or even a CRB/DBS (criminal records check). I interview informally in my own home, and with employees I am flexible, easy going and more than fair, taking into consideration their individual circumstances.

However, despite the fact I am completely non-ambulatory, I have never used a hoist. Thus far, family and carers have always preferred to lift me manually as it’s much quicker and frankly less faff! I’m only tiny – approximately 5 feet tall and 5.5 stone in weight. So until very recently, it has always suited to go without a hoist.

Understandably this is off-putting to potential applicants. But, every carer I’ve ever employed has openly admitted that working for me is a breeze compared to any other job they’ve had, and that for them the lifting is a non-issue. Nevertheless, I appreciate that most would prefer not to lift – that’s fair enough.

Hoists

With this in mind, I instigated the process of applying for a ceiling track hoist to be installed in my ground-floor bedroom/ensuite bathroom. I will need a H-frame in the bathroom and a short track from my bed to the bathroom.

Not a huge ask really, particularly as I have never received any support in the way of equipment. Everything I have – wheelchairs, bed, bath lift etc. has been self-funded. The post-code lottery is a very real and unjust thing, people! But that’s a topic for another day…

Dealing with Community Occupational Therapists

I contacted the community Occupational Therapists, explained the situation and requested a needs assessment. I was initially fobbed off with the excuse that they’re vastly understaffed and that I would need to be terminally ill in order to qualify. When I asked how they suggest I manage after Mom’s operation, the OT replied that I should “camp out” and be dressed, bathed and toileted on my bed!

Disgusted at her casual disregard, I asked how she would feel having all her personal care needs carried out on the bed she sleeps in. “Oh well, this is the situation we’re in. It can’t be helped”, was her insensitive response.

I then contacted my neuromuscular consultant who wrote a letter of support. On receipt of this letter, the OT’s suddenly found time to carry out a needs assessment in my home – shocker! (It’s not what you know, but who you know, right!?)

Following this, two reps – one from TPG, the other from Prism Medical – came and measured up in order to provide quotes for the ceiling hoist. I have since learned that the second quote is unusable, which frankly is no surprise, as he clearly had no clue what he was doing; at one point asking to see the gas meter. Even the OT who accompanied him questioned his experience.

In the meantime I have been issued with a portable hoist, though it has taken many weeks to receive a usable sling. Rather than measuring me, then visiting me in my home with a variety of slings to try, the OT’s insisted on sending one at a time. After much harassment from me, a community OT finally conceded and actually attended to properly assess me for a sling.

Honestly, they complain that they have a backlog of work and no time, and yet they waste so much. The sling issue could have been carried out in one appointment. Simple, done, move on. But instead, they chose to drag it out for weeks simply because they wouldn’t visit or listen to the patient.

And now…

Today is Sunday 10th September, and no further progress has been made with the ceiling hoist. Yet again I will have to chase the OT’s, otherwise nothing will ever happen. Sad but true.

I had taken on a second carer who began shadowing at the beginning of August. She was very enthusiastic, supportive and accommodating – said all the right things. Then whilst on my way to visit mom in the hospital, two days after her surgery, I received a message from the new carer, who was due to work that evening. She issued a stream of excuses as to why she couldn’t (translate: wouldn’t) do the job.

Until then, my current carer had always been present. Essentially it turns out she was happy to come and get paid to watch someone else do the job. She just didn’t want to have to do any work herself. Now I know why she’s had so many jobs!

So, as it stands I am managing as best I can with my one part-time PCA, though she is planning to leave in late October to train as a paramedic; thus posing yet another obstacle.

Having realised how long this post is, I think I will leave it there for today, though there is much more to tell. Suffice to say, the saga continues…