Top 10 Wheelchair Accessible Hotels in Tenerife

Guest Post

I was recently contacted by Orange Badge, who supply mobility aids, such as wheelchairs and mobility scooters, to holiday-goers in Tenerife. With expert knowledge, they offer free accessibility advice and information to ensure a stress-free stay in Tenerife.

About Orange Badge:

Established for over 20 years, the name comes from the original Orange Badge disability parking scheme in the UK.

Since 2003, they are the largest, most respected and professional mobility supplier on the island. Orange Badge provide unique products and free advice.

The Orange Badge team, who between them speak 7 languages, have lived and worked in Tenerife for over 60 years. they offer a unique ability to help you find mobility equipment and the most suitable places to spend your holiday.


Top 10 Hotels

1. Sheraton La Caleta Resort & Spa

Sheraton La Caleta Resort & Spa is a luxurious hotel in the picturesque Costa Adeje, just 200m from the beach. The terracotta coloured hotel boasts 284 spacious rooms with private terraces, 4 restaurants, 2 bars, a spa, fitness centre, and 3 pools.

2. Iberostar Grand Hotel Salome

Iberostar Grand Hotel Salome is a luxurious 5-star hotel. With stylish and modern rooms that have been recently refurbished, the Iberostar is an adult-only hotel that offers exciting cuisine, beautiful sea views, an infinity pool and spa, and even butler service for total relaxation.

3. TUI Sensimar Arona Gran & Spa

TUI Sensimar Arona Gran & Spa is just 800m to the buzzing centre of Los Cristianos and 800m to beautiful sandy beaches. This is a luxurious hotel with stunning views of the sea and harbour, 2 relaxing pools, and lively entertainment.

4. Gran Tacande Wellness & Relax

Gran Tacande Wellness & Relax is an elegant 5* hotel on the seafront in Costa Adeje. Dedicated to making your holiday as relaxing as possible, the hotel has 4 pools, a spa, restaurants, bars, lush interiors, and beautiful grounds for relaxing in the Tenerife sunshine.

5. Adrian Hoteles Roca Nivaria

Adrian Hoteles Roca Nivaria is centred around a family atmosphere. With fantastic sea views, 2 infinity pools, 3 restaurants, a lift that takes you down to the beach, and shuttle services to Playa de Fanabe and Costa Adeje, book this hotel for a relaxing and fun family holiday.

6. Hotel Villa Cortes

Inspired by Mexican hacienda design, Hotel Villa Cortes is located on the beach in Playa de las America’s golden mile, close to many shops, bars, and restaurants. Boasting 6 restaurants, a spa, a freshwater pool with waterfall and a saltwater pool, the hotel promises a fantastic holiday.

7. H10 Conquistador

H10 Conquistador is a contemporary, modern, and stylish hotel in Playa de las Americas. It benefits from 4 restaurants, 3 tropical pools, family entertainment, and access to both a shingle and sandy beach.

8. Hotel Paradise Park

Located in Los Cristianos, Hotel Paradise Park has stunning panoramic views of the town and the coast. It offers rooftop and grotto pools, beautiful gardens, and a shuttle bus service to the beach.

9. Adrián Hoteles Jardines De Nivaria

Located in Costa Adeje, Adrián Hoteles Jardines De Nivaria is a beachfront hotel with art deco interior, tropical gardens, and 2 lagoon pools. It has direct access to Playa Fanabe beach and benefits from 3 gourmet restaurants, a spa, and evening entertainment.

10. Mar y Sol Hotel

Just 400m from the sea promenade in Southwest Tenerife, Mar y Sol Hotel promises a lively and relaxing holiday with spacious apartments, 2 pools, restaurants, bars, and a gym.

Going The Extra Mile for MDUK

On the weekend of 12th May, my amazing brother and his two friends took on The National Three Peaks Challenge. This involves climbing the three highest peaks of Scotland, England and Wales, within 24 hours.

The total walking distance is 23 miles (37km) and the total ascent is 3064 metres 6o(10,052ft). The total driving distance is 462 miles.

The three mountains are:


All of this is in aid of Muscular Dystrophy UK.

As you may already know, I have lived my entire life with a rare form of MD – Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. Having witnessed his little sister grow up with the effects of this muscle-wasting condition, my brother decided he wanted to do something – something big! – to help make a difference to the lives of others living with MD. That something is the National Three Peaks Challenge.


Report from my brother:

Friday 11th May: We drove ourselves from Worcestershire and stopped overnight at a place called Fort William in Scotland.

Saturday 12th May: The challenge began at 16:40 as we started to climb Ben Nevis, in sunny but very warm weather (a little too warm). We peaked in 2 hours 10 mins, reaching the snowy summit at 18:50. Visibility was perfect and gave us spectacular panoramic views of the other mountains in the area.

Ben Nevis, accomplished!
Ben Nevis! One peak down, two to go…

We then ran down to the car in a total of 3 hours 45 mins, before driving through the night to the hamlet of Wasdale Head in the Lake District, to start our climb up Scafell Pike.

04:19 – Peaked at Scafell Pike

Sunday 13th May: It was pitch black and rainy all the way up to the top (04:19), but the weather cleared on the way down and the Sun started to rise, making it easier to navigate. However, our descent took longer than we hoped due to extremely slippy rocks underfoot, combined with a lack of sleep.

View over Wast Water at first light during descent down Scafell Pike

Finally, we drove on to Pen-y-Pass in Snowdonia to begin our climb up Snowdon. The weather was perfect – sunny with very clear visibility. We took the Miners Track up to the summit (12:30) and then the Pyg Track back down.

The hardest part for me was the first 30 mins of our trek up Ben Nevis. It gets incredibly steep straight away and in the extreme heat I soon got jelly legs. But as we got closer to the summit, it cooled down and I was able to splash my face with cold water from the stream coming down the mountain.

Collectively, we all found the biggest challenge was to keep going despite the lack of sleep. It was hard to maintain enough energy and endurance to stay focused and not trip over!

Challenge completed at: 14:43 in 22 hours 3 mins


I would like to say a personal thank you to the best big brother anyone could ever wish for! We don’t do gushy at all, so he’s probably reading this wondering why I’m being so nice. Rob – you know how I feel. Loves you more x

The bro x

To Adam & Dan – thank you both for being such good friends and for selflessly offering your time and efforts. It means more than you realise.


To anyone reading this, please share the link and if possible, make a donation to support the great work of Muscular Dystrophy UK:

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/3peaksformd

Hoists in Hotels | MDUK Trailblazers

Last month Muscular Dystrophy Trailblazers launched their report following an investigation into the need for hoists in UK hotels.

Over 100 Trailblazers responded to the survey, sharing both positive and negative experiences.

This is an important issue that affects the lives of so many disabled people, myself included. Without the essential facility of a ceiling hoist, we are denied the opportunity to travel, whether for work or leisure purposes.

With only 18 UK hotels having installed ceiling hoists for disabled guests, this is clearly an overlooked and ill-considered feature. Who is designing these ‘accessible’ hotel rooms, anyway?!


I was one of the respondents to the Trailblazers survey. Here is my view:

“I am an infrequent traveller, not because I lack the desire but because it is so difficult to find appropriately adapted and affordable hotels. Even getting away for a single night is an almost impossible challenge, since hotel rooms are, disappointingly, not equipped with ceiling track hoists as standard.

Although some people get around this problem by hiring (at an extra cost) or taking with them a portable hoist, this is not practical for all. Portable hoists are cumbersome, difficult to store, transport and manoeuvre. Furthermore, many people simply don’t have access to a vehicle large enough to carry such large-scale equipment.   

I have Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and am completely non-ambulant. I can’t safely transfer and so I either have to be hoisted or manually lifted. Understandably most people, excluding family, are reluctant to do the latter. So, if I want or need to get away from home, my only current option is to ask family members if they are willing to lend their time and support (far from ideal).

With less than 20 hotels in the UK equipped with ceiling track hoists, our options are severely limited. For those of us who need this facility, a premium cost is incurred, and then we are restricted to specific locations. Sadly we are not free as others are, to occupy any hotel room in a hotel of our choice, anywhere in the country.”


Click here to find out more information and from other contributors.

What I took on holiday to Whitby | Wheelchair Life

I recently spent a week in historic Whitby, staying in an impressively accessible cottage (read all about it here!)

But before setting off, I had to prepare and plan, even more so than the usual holiday-maker, as I have Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and am wheelchair-bound.

There are many things us wheelie folk need to take with us when travelling, besides clothes and a bucket and spade!

Here is my definitive guide…

1. Both my manual and powered wheelchairs: This year we ventured up north to Whitby where the terrain is rugged. I therefore thought it wise to take my manual wheelchair as a backup, should my power chair struggle. The luxury of travelling within the UK is that there is no luggage limit. I have a Citroen Berlingo wheelchair accessible vehicle (WAV) in which there’s plenty of room for all the added extras I need to take with me. I personally would never take my powered chair on an airplane, having heard so many horror stories of loss and irreparable damage. But travelling by car means that I can easily take both my wheelchairs.

2. Wheelchair charger: No brainer! I wouldn’t get far without it.

3. Bipap machine and a spare mask: It’s always best to take at least one spare of everything you NEED when travelling.

4. Extension lead: you can’t be certain of where plug sockets will be located in your holiday accommodation. I need at least one situated next to my bed to power my NIV (Bipap) machine throughout the night. This isn’t always the case and so an extension lead can be extremely useful if you have a lot of equipment to charge.

5. Lightweight thermal blanket: I struggle to adjust my position in bed and I often find the duvets in holiday accommodation too heavy for me to turn. So, I prefer to take my own blanket, which can be rolled up and compacted. This means that I don’t have to worry about those heavy, immovable duvets when travelling.

6. Medication:

  • Antibiotics, should I become ill whilst on holiday (best to cover yourself!)
  • Antihistamines (Boots Hayfever Relief Instant-melts are pricey but good if you can’t swallow pills)
  • Spare inhalers (I use Salbutamol – marketed as Ventolin)
  • Painkillers (Nurofen Meltlets Lemon are good for those who can’t swallow pills)

7. Lists: As someone with a disability, it’s good practice to do a little research before travelling, even if only for a day trip. I like to make a list of accessible places to dine, attractions, transport and even the places to avoid.

Time spent pre-planning will allow you more time to enjoy your holiday.


If you have a disability, what extra items and equipment do you take with you when travelling?

Let me know in the comments, I’d love to hear from you!

My Wheelchair Accessible Holiday to Whitby

Once again, the lovely SimplyEmma invited me to guest-post on her blog (go check it out!) and so I chose to write about my recent holiday to Whitby, North Yorkshire.
To read my second blog post for Emma, click here.

I recently returned from my annual, week-long family holiday. This year, my parents and I chose to stay in the UK after all the hassle we had last year with flying (find my review of our trip to Salou, Spain here).

So, back in February we booked a self-catering accessible cottage through Disabled Holidays.

We’ve always loved Yorkshire; the history, countryside, charm and culture. But we also wanted to be near the coast and so we opted for the seaside town of Whitby, situated in the Borough of Scarborough.

Accommodation

A wheelchair accessible holiday cottage in Sneaton Thorpe:

  • A large ground-floor property, all rooms are generously sized. More than enough room to manoeuvre with hoists, wheelchairs and any other equipment required.
  • 2 bedrooms, sleeps 4. Large living/dining area and sizeable separate kitchen.
  • Huge wet room with both bath and shower! There is a wall-mounted shower seat, though these are rarely any use to me as my balance is poor. I therefore pre-requested a static shower chair with armrests (as you can see from the photo, there are no armrests on the chair!) However, there are sturdy, wall-mounted grab rails either side and so this suited fine.
  • The door ridges could be problematic for some wheelchair users. I use a Quantum 600 powered chair which managed the front door but struggled with the patio door. Alternatively, I went around the side of the property and through the gate in order to access the garden.
  • Stunning views of Whitby coastline, the surrounding countryside and the Abbey in the distance.
  • Ideal location: quiet and peaceful yet only a 10 minute drive to Whitby town centre.
  • Overall very impressive and well thought-out accommodation. My only complaint is the beds, which were VERY firm and uncomfortable. I use an electric adjustable bed at home with a regular mattress but I’ve always slept on normal beds when away, without issue. There was however, plenty of room underneath to use a manual hoist should you need to.
  • I would thoroughly recommend this property to anyone with a disability, particularly wheelchair users. My only suggestion would be to take some form of mattress topper and maybe a blanket as only heavy, winter duvets were provided.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Places I visited

Robin hoods bay

  • Historic fishing village, scenic views. 10-15 minute drive, south of Whitby.
  • Pavements are fairly wide and smooth. A reasonable amount of dropped kerbs.
  • Sufficient disabled parking (not exempt from payment).
  • Most pubs and restaurants are wheelchair accessible.
  • Very steep towards the bay itself. I chose not to venture down as the gradient was too steep for my wheelchair.

Whitby town

  • Could do with more dropped kerbs although generally flat in the west side of the town. Pier is mostly accessible (steps to reach the very end but you’re not missing out).
  • The beach is accessible via slope and the sands are firm (powered wheelchairs and scooters may struggle!)
  • You can hire mobility equipment including scooters, manual and powered wheelchairs, beach wheelchairs and even an all-terrain wheelchair from Whitby Tourist Information. I would advise you do this in advance! Call: 01947 821001 or click here for more information.
  • West side of town is much more commercialised than the east side.
  • Plenty of disabled parking (not exempt from payment) and accessible toilets (take your Radar key). I recommend the new Marina car park toilets, located near the Tourist Information Centre, as they’re the best equipped and the most pleasant.
  • East side far less accessible depending on your tolerance for cobbled streets. Manual wheelchairs would struggle unless pulled backwards which is obviously not ideal or particularly appealing. I ventured through the cobbled streets and Whitby Market Place in my Quantum 600 and didn’t get stuck – so it is doable.
  • There are some interesting shops showcasing local arts, crafts and Whitby jet jewellery.

Scarborough North Bay

  • Flat, wide, smooth, even pavements.
  • Dropped kerbs, free disabled parking, ramp access to beach which is accessible depending on the wheelchair or scooter you use.
  • My heavy Quantum 600 power chair got stuck in the sand, and I had to call on the assistance of some friendly locals to haul me back onto the pavement. However, manual wheelchairs shouldn’t encounter any problems as the sands are flat and firm.

East pier and Scarborough town centre

  • Impressively accessible: flat, even, wide pavements and plenty of dropped kerbs.
  • Free disabled parking.
  • Much more commercialised and populated than the North Bay, so if you prefer the peace and quiet, stick to the north.
  • Lots of amusement arcades, fast food and tourist/gift shops.
  • Beach again is very flat and accessible although powered chairs may struggle.
  • Accessible buses and sight-seeing tour buses.
  • The main disabled toilet in town (Radar key required) is small and unpleasant! I would use one of the accessible toilets within the pubs or restaurants.

Whitby Abbey

  • The Abbey is surprisingly accessible for all. I really enjoyed my visit as it was so easy to get around and there was nothing I missed out on.
  • Smooth, even paths and slopes where necessary. Even the grass isn’t bumpy.
  • 4 disabled parking bays, 2 large lifts and disabled toilets at the main entrance and in the tea rooms.
  • All staff were extremely helpful and advised us of the most accessible routes. Even the gift shop was a decent size, allowing wheelchair users to browse without bumping into other visitors.
  • I highly recommend visiting the Abbey!
  • Obviously, the famous 199 steps are in no way disabled-friendly. But you can park at the top and take in the view.

Final Thoughts

While North Yorkshire is admittedly very hilly, rugged and rural, it is for the most part accessible to those with disabilities, as I discovered. It’s not always easy or comfortable to get around in a wheelchair, but it’s worth a bloody good try as the North Yorkshire Moors has so much to offer.

There are many narrow, winding, steep roads and country lanes to navigate. For this reason I think it’s important for anyone with a disability to have access to a car in order to explore Whitby and the surrounding area.

* All photos taken by me


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Holiday Season | My trip to Salou, Spain (2016)

Though I would like to be, I’m not a frequent traveller. Living with a physical disability – in my case, Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy – can make overseas travel difficult and stressful. However, after several years without a holiday (neither at home in the UK or abroad) I decided it was about time I set off in search of sun, sea and sand – a sight unseen here in the Midlands!

Most importantly, the holiday must meet all my accessibility requirements, (I am a non-ambulant, powered wheelchair-user). Another major consideration was my parents, with whom I would be travelling. This presented me with the task of organising a holiday that would satisfy their wants and needs as well as my own.

Of course, it’s far from ideal to travel with your parents at my age (27), but it was my only option at the time. I resisted their considerate invitations to accompany them abroad for years, but I had reached the point of desperation – one way or another, I really needed to get away. There’s only so much British weather a girl can take!


Planning & Booking:

7 years earlier, I visited Tarragona, situated in the Costa Dorada region of Spain. I found it to be a great place to roam around in a powered wheelchair. Back then I booked with Enable Holidays.

Salou, situated in the Costa Dorada region of Spain

For personal reassurance regarding reliable accessibility (and frankly to make life a little easier), we decided to return to Costa Dorada. When comparing prices online, I found it significantly cheaper to book with Disabled Access Holidays (DAH) – a small business based in Glasgow, UK.

Throughout the whole booking process, I interacted with the same agent who sorted everything. Airport assistance and wheelchair accessible taxi transfers were organised. An electric wheelchair was also hired for the week, as I prefer to travel with just my manual chair for fear of damage to my Quantum 600 (I’ve heard horror stories from fellow wheelchair-users).

The only thing I had to arrange was travel insurance for myself. DAH recommended AllClear, even offering a discount code. I enquired with a few providers though they all quoted a similar price. Just one week in Spain would have cost me over £500 and so, admittedly, I chose to take the risk and travel without insurance.


Off we go…

We flew from Birmingham airport on 7th July (2016), arriving in sunny Reus after a thoroughly chaotic checking-in and boarding process. Conveyer belt malfunctions, lack of staff, delays and the absence of assistance at Birmingham established an initial sense of unease.

What really frustrated me was the fact that we boarded via the centre of the plane – my parents and I being made to wait until last. Since our seats were at the front of the plane, I had to struggle some distance in an old aisle chair, bumping elbows with strangers all the way (bear in mind, I’m pretty damn petite). I can’t stand these cronky aisle seats, mainly because they offer no postural support whatsoever and are incredibly uncomfortable. My balance is poor and consequently I always feel I’m about to fall when forced to resort to one.

Upon reaching our front row seats, my poor Dad was left to manually transfer me by himself, as no one offered to help. There was a complete lack of care and consideration from all staff at Birmingham.

A short and uneventful flight ensued. This was one of my major concerns when organising the holiday. A long haul flight was a no-go as there’s just no way I would be able to access the bathroom. With the best will in the world, in my case it really can’t be done.


Disembarking at Reus:

15-20 minute transfer from Reus Airport to Hotel Medplaya Piramide in Salou, Spain

After the disappointment at Birmingham airport I was relieved to receive a much more conscientious service when disembarking at Reus. The assistance for passengers with disabilities was swift and effective. Without question, the staff safely lifted me from my seat straight into my manual wheelchair which was brought to the front of the plane where we exited, this time without an audience. I was so thankful as I hate to have to burden my parents with the physically exhaustive task of manually transferring me.

Our pre-booked taxi transfer was at first nowhere to be found but soon arrived after being prompted by a phone call. The English speaking driver was extremely helpful and repeatedly assured us that she or another driver would collect us from our hotel at the time and date arranged.


The Hotel:

Medplaya Piramide Hotel in Salou, Spain

And so we found ourselves at the Medplaya Piramide 4 star hotel in Salou, Costa Dorada. The three of us shared one, accessible room situated on the second floor resulting in a daily battle for the lift which everyone felt the need to use, regardless of age or ability.

Aside from the presence of a grimy shower chair with one, dismembered footplate, it’s difficult to see how our room could be considered ‘accessible’. The bathroom comprised a regular bath along with a roll in shower which flooded our entire room and out into the hallway within seconds. The bathroom door veneer was all peeled away suggesting this is a long term issue which the hotel has failed to address. We had to call reception for extra towels to mop up the excess water flooding our room after every brief shower.

Furthermore, the sink was far too high and unreachable for me to use whilst sat in my chair. The toilet was lower than normal and lacked any surrounding support aside from a fairly redundant and misplaced grab rail affixed to the wall. A small lip in the patio door may cause an obstacle for some in accessing the sizeable exterior balcony but with a bit of a run up I didn’t have a problem in my hired power chair.

The hotel itself, both interior and exterior, I found to be suitable for anyone with a disability. With smooth, flat surfaces, ramp access where needed, wide open spaces to manoeuvre, and a large ground-floor disabled loo, I was able to roam around completely independently. There’s also a pool hoist – a clean, fully functioning pool hoist!

With plenty to keep you occupied including a bar, restaurant, pool room, terrace area, as well as day and night-time entertainment, this modern hotel caters for all ages and abilities. The staff too were welcoming, sociable and most accommodating.


Location:

There are some steep pavements surrounding the hotel to be aware of, but plenty of slopes and access points more than make up for this. The hotel is ideally situated, just a short stroll to the impressively accessible Levante beach, 250m from Salou town centre and 1.5km from Port Aventura theme park. The area for the most part is flat and even, making it ideal for wheelchair users.

The Beach:

I have to say the major selling point for me was the beach. Though not an experienced traveller, of all the beaches I have ever visited this one is by far the best. It’s vast, it’s flat, and there are numerous platforms which allow wheelchairs and prams to enjoy a smooth ride right down to the waters edge. I was pleased to see many others with various disabilities accessing the sands without the all too familiar struggle.

Furthermore, the individuals who hire out sun loungers could always be counted on to offer a helping hand if and when needed. Without question they would often come running to the assistance of someone. This is not part of their job, nor is it commonplace (sadly), and so I feel it worthy of mention.


On the whole my week in Salou provided much needed respite and relaxation. However, the biggest dilemma was saved for our last day. Our pre-booked taxi never arrived so we were forced to ask reception staff to telephone for a local cab asap. This took over an hour to arrive since there is only one wheelchair accessible taxi in the local area. Fortunately our return flight was delayed otherwise we would certainly have missed our flight. Despite this rather stressful conclusion to an otherwise enjoyable holiday, I would definitely recommend Disabled Access Holidays. However, it’s also important to do your own research and investigation prior to committing to any accommodation and travel arrangements.


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